Retaining Rings at Huyett.com

What is a retaining ring?

Retaining rings are often used as fasteners that exert a radial clamping force to the outside of a shaft or the inside of a bore or housing. Used in both grooved and grooveless applications, retaining rings provide a shoulder or load bearing surface that positions and limits movement of parts. They also take up end play crated by accumulated tolerances from retained parts. There are a few key advantages to using retaining rings over other types of fasteners including reduced machining costs, simpler product designs, and more efficient assembly. For detailed information on the different types of retaining rings offered by G.L. Huyett, check out the FAQs below. If you want to learn more about the history of retaining rings, check out our blog.


Crescent Rings

Crescent Rings

Crescent Rings, or C‑Clips, are radially‑assembled retaining rings that snap into the machined groove of a shaft creating retention. Their section height is narrow, providing good clearance capabilities, especially when clearance is minimal. They are absent of teeth and deep sets, resulting in lower thrust load ratings than E‑Clips. G.L. Huyett's inventory of crescent rings includes a huge size range fit for almost any application.

 

  • Available in copper, spring steel, and stainless steel
  • Also available in cadmium, passivated, phosphate, zinc clear, and zinc yellow finishes
  • Quick, efficient installation with applicators and dispensers

 

Crimp Rings

Crimp Rings

Crimp rings, also called crimp circlips, are a "C" shaped wire formed retaining ring that is installed axially on a grooved shaft or rod. The gap furnished in the ring, which allows for axial installation, is crimped closed to provide secure fitment to its mating part. Since crimp rings are made from material lacking spring like properties, they cannot be reused once removed.

 

  • Available in sizes 3/16", 5/16", and 7/16"
  • Made from C1008‑1010 Steel
  • Commonly used as a retaining mechanism in cylinder locks

 

D‑Rings

D Rings

D‑Rings are simple, sturdy, and inexpensive wire form fasteners easily recognizable by their "D" shape. The smooth, edgeless design creates a strong, durable anchor point that is excellent for textile applications, such as tarps, tents, collars, and straps. D‑rings are a great choice over round rings if limited material movement is desired. The corners of the ring limit slide through whereas fully round rings allow material to slide around the entire circumference of the ring.

 

  • Offered in brass, nickel plate, plain, and zinc clear finish
  • Range of sizes available from 5/16" to 1‑1/8"
  • Simple, versatile, and economical
  • Can be mounted to a variety of surfaces using straps to create pivoting anchor points

 

E‑Clips

E-Clips

E‑Clips — also known as E‑Rings — are three pronged, stamped clips that fit into machined grooves of smaller diameter tubes and shafts. E‑clips are installed radially and have a wider shoulder than other types of external rings, thus providing a larger retaining area and yielding higher thrust load capacity. These popular retaining rings are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from automotive to medical.

 

  • Offered in copper, carbon spring steel, and stainless steel materials
  • Available in cadmium, phosphate, passivated, zinc clear, zinc phosphate, and zinc yellow finishes
  • G.L. Huyett is a proud distributor of Rotor Clip® E‑Clips!

 

Grip Rings

Grip Rings

Radial grip rings, also called RG Shaft Rings, are stamped self‑locking retaining rings that are radially applied to a shaft. Due to their self‑locking design, radial grip rings can be installed on shafts with or without a machined groove. Grooveless shafts should be a softer grade than the ring to allow for a secure grip. Consideration must also be made when re‑using grip rings as load capacity is reduced each time the ring is re‑applied to a shaft.

 

  • Available in copper and steel materials
  • Can be installed against a retained part, nearly eliminating end play
  • Works with applicators for efficient installation

 

Hog Rings

Hog Rings

A handy and tough fastener, hog rings are the go‑to fastener for applications such as sealing sausage casings, joining mesh or wire cages, fastening wire to fences, or the manufacture and maintenance of upholstered goods. G.L. Huyett is proud to supply this staple hardware of the meat packing industry and other professions. Hog Rings hold a firm grip that is unlikely to fail and are generally more secure than nails or staples.

 

  • Various sizes of hog rings are available in carbon or stainless steel
  • Optional galvanized or copper finishes available
  • Useful in a wide variety of applications

 

Housing Rings

Housing Rings

Housing Rings, or HO Rings, are axially assembled internal retaining rings that are made from zinc plated spring steel and install with needle‑nose pliers into a housing or bore. These tapered section type rings have a taper design that allows the ring to maintain constant pressure against axles, gears, and bearings inside machinery housings to prevent slippage. This snap ring variant features a high thrust load rating and provides a shoulder that retains components better than spiral or constant section rings. They are available in metric and imperial sizes and in stacked rolls that prevent tangling for ease in handling.

 

  • Made in beryllium copper, carbon spring steel, and stainless steel
  • Offered in plain, cadmium, passivated, phosphate, zinc clear, and zinc yellow finishes
  • Featured lug holes allow rings to be compressed and removed using snap ring pliers

 

Interlocking Rings

Interlocking Rings

Interlocking Rings are re‑usable radially‑assembled retaining rings composed of two identical semicircular halves. They are held together by interlocking prongs that latch into a groove of a shaft. Their symmetrical shape dynamically "balances" the part which allows them to effectively withstand high speed rotation. Our online inventory offers a selection of finishes and a wide range of diameters.

 

  • Available in copper, spring steel, and stainless steel
  • Offered in passivated, cadmium, phosphate, and zinc yellow and clear finishes
  • Clean and attractive appearance of interlocking rings is perfect for exposed applications

 

Lock Nuts

Lock Nuts

Bearing locknuts, sometimes called shaft locknuts or bearing retaining nuts, are utilized to secure bearings onto a shaft and are designed to prevent the loosening of components due to vibration and rotation. Bearing locknuts possess a different appearance from traditional hex lock nuts. Bearing locknuts are typically rounded on the outside with keyed slots. This design requires a special tool, called a spanner wrench or socket, to be removed or installed. Bearing locknuts are used in a wide variety of applications including the automotive and agriculture industries.

 

  • Available in stainless steel, alloy steel, and low carbon steel
  • Offered in Metric and Inch sizes
  • Commonly used in conjunction with lock washers and machine keys

 

Lock Washers

Lock Washers

Lock washers are designed to reduce the loosening of bolts and screws from their mating assembly. Lock washers come in a variety of types, the most common being the split and toothed washer. The spring tension of these washers prevents loosening by creating pressure against a fastener's threads and its mating part. Split lock washers are a helically split ring whose open ends dig into its partnering fastener and joining material to reduce counter clockwise rotation. Toothed washer varieties are available with either internal or external teeth, also called tangs. When a screw or bolt is tightened down onto these washers, the tangs "bite" into the fastened material with moderate spring resistance against the fastener reducing the likelihood of loosening caused by vibrations.

 

  • Offered in alloy, carbon, and stainless steel
  • Available in plain, zinc clear, and zinc yellow finishes
  • External toothed washers are commonly used with Bearing Locknuts

 

Poodle Clips

Poodle Clips

Poodle Clips, sometimes called PO‑Clips, are an external, radially‑assembled, heavy duty ring with large shoulders and thicker material than standard E‑clips. The PO‑clip's shoulders, or "ears", offer extra retention surface against the retained part. PO‑clips are also available in thinner sizes as a standard series of rings known as POL. Poodle Clips can be found in a variety of applications including shift cable assemblies in automotive applications. Install using an applicator or standard pliers and screwdriver.

 

  • Made in carbon and stainless steel
  • Available in plain, phosphate, and zinc yellow finishes
  • Simple installation using standard plier, screwdriver, or an applicator

 

Prong Locked Rings

Prong Locked Rings

Prong Locked Rings, sometimes called EL Clips, are a variation of a bowed E‑Clip with prongs that secure the clip into place. This radially‑installed part functions as both a shoulder and spring due to its curved shape and prings. High thrust load capacity and unique design make this a good retainer against moving parts.

 

  • Made in the USA from carbon spring steel
  • Offered in phosphate and zinc yellow finishes
  • Simplify installation using an applicator or screwdriver

 

Push‑On Rings

Push-On Rings

Push‑On Rings are a self‑locking retaining ring that applies frictional force against a shaft or housing to hold a mechanical component in place. Commonly found in external or internal self‑locking designs, Push‑On Rings do not require grooves or additional machining to be secured into place. They are excellent for securing parts in lighter duty applications not subject to substantial thrust loads.

 

  • Made in beryllium copper, carbon spring steel, and stainless steel
  • Offered in plain, cadmium, passivated, phosphate, zinc clear, and zinc yellow finishes
  • Self‑locking design allows for variable positioning along a shaft or bore
  • Can compensate for accumulated tolerances in assembled parts

 

Rectangular Wire Rings

Rectangular Wire Rings

Rectangular wire retaining rings, or rectangular‑section rings, are retaining rings made from carbon spring steel with a rectangular cross section. This style of retaining ring provides a larger shoulder for retaining parts on a shaft or inside a bore or housing. Rectangular wire rings are often used in fear systems or bearing assemblies.

 

  • Made in carbon spring steel with oil dip or phosphate finish
  • Made in metric and inch sizes
  • Suitable for grooved internal and external applications

 

Round Wire Rings

Round Wire Rings

Round wire rings, or round section wire rings, are a split ring formed and cut from round spring wire. Round wire snap rings are designed for rounded grooves in external and internal shaft or bore applications. Round wire rings tend to hold tighter tolerances, however they possess less load bearing capacity than their square and rectangular counterparts.

 

  • Made in carbon, spring, and stainless steel
  • Offered in plain or phosphate finishes
  • A wide variety of gap ranges allow for axial and radial installation

 

Snap Rings

Snap Rings

Snap Rings, sometimes referred to as circlips or seeger rings, are a stamped tapered section retaining ring. These axially installed rings are often used in external applications to secure parts on grooved shafts, pins, or studs. The protruding section of the ring provides a shoulder for retaining parts, reducing cost of machining shoulders. Snap rings are found in a variety of applications including automotive transmissions and hub assemblies.

 

  • Made from beryllium copper, carbon spring steel, and stainless steel material
  • Offered in a variety of finishes including cadmium yellow dichromate, phosphate, and zinc
  • Integrated lugs allow for installation using snap ring pliers
  • Circular design provides maximum surface contact

 

Spiral Rings

Spiral Rings

Spiral retaining rings are commonly used for shafts (external), housing/bores (internal), and bearing retention – or any application that requires 360° contact with a groove and shoulder of the assembling part. These rings are coiled from flat wire and designed for easy installation and removal, requiring no special tools. G.L. Huyett carries a variety of materials and finishes such as stainless and spring steel.

 

  • Offered in stainless steel, carbon spring, and Inconel materials
  • Increasingly popular in large size and short run applications
  • Internal, external, and tabbed spiral retaining rings available

 

Split Rings

Split Rings

A split ring is a metal, wire formed ring that consists of two complete turns of a helix pressed flat together. They are versatile rings used by manufacturers in many industries, such as automotive, aerospace, and fishing industries. Split rings operate as heavy‑duty wire with an offset or "kickout" to ease installation processes and are generally made from heavier gauge wire than circle cotters. G.L. Huyett provides a variety of split rings in various sizes to meet most applications. Strong and durable, our rings will hold up when you need them to.

 

  • Available in spring tempered and stainless steel material
  • Offered in zinc or nickel finishes
  • Inside diameters 0.107" to 2.832" available

 

Square Wire Rings

Square Wire Rings

Square wire rings, or square wire retaining rings, are a split ring formed and cut from square spring wire. They are designed for a greater degree of shoulder strength than round wire snap rings. They are used in a wide variety of heavy‑duty applications, particularly fitting for shaft applications with a lot of tension.

 

  • Available in spring steel
  • Offered in corrosion resistant zinc yellow
  • Fitment for shaft diameters ranging from 3/16" to 2‑1/4"

 

Upholstery Rings

Upholstery Rings

Upholstery Rings, commonly called hog rings, are u‑shaped rings bent during installation to secure two objects together. Once installed, they feature a firm grip that is unlikely to work itself loose and are generally more secure than nails or staples. To ease installation, bent or straight hog ring pliers are recommended. Typical applications include, auto, marine, and airplane upholstery, home furnishings, chain link fencing, arts & crafts, gardening, traps & cages, and sealing bags, burlap or plastic.

 

  • Offered in bright steel material with a plain finish
  • Universal application for a wide range of mediums
  • Easy installation with hog ring pliers

 

X‑Rings

X-Rings

X‑Rings, or X retaining fasteners, are a heavier construction crimp style fastener commonly used in grooved shaft assemblies providing 360 degree closure. These rings are installed radially and secured by simply squeezing the legs of the ring together with pliers. X‑Rings can be used in nearly any grooved shaft or pin application. However, they should not be reused once removed.

 

  • Made from spring steel in zinc clear finish
  • Heavy construction offers strong retention
  • Easy installation with simple tools

 

Ring Assortments

Ring Assortments

Retaining ring assortments are part of G.L. Huyett's HandiChek® assortment collection, providing our customers with a simple and customizable way to showcase a variety of retaining rings. They are available in hanging or stacking assortments, blister packs, tool sleeves, and big shot kits. All assortments are retail ready with GS1 US Barcodes for easy scanning.

 

  • ISO 9001:2015 Certified
  • Easy bin stocking
  • Great as maintenance kits

 

 
 


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
By Ring Type

CRESCENT RINGS

What is a crescent ring?

Crescent rings, or C‑Clips, are radially‑assembled retaining rings that snap into the machined groove of a shaft creating retention. Crescent rings have a similar design to E‑Clips minus the teeth and deep sets. Their section height is narrow, providing good clearance capabilities, especially when clearance is minimal.

How to install and remove crescent rings

Crescent rings, or C‑Clips, can be installed radially using an applicator or simple hand tools. To install, insert the closed end of the C‑Clip into opening of the applicator leaving the open ends of the clip facing away from the applicator. Next, while still seated in the applicator, position the open ends of the clip in the groove of the shaft and firmly press into place. Inspect the clip to ensure it is seated evenly and securely in place. Crescent rings can be installed in high capacity production environments using automated tooling.

Removing a crescent ring can be accomplished using simple hand tools. Using a pair of needle-nose pliers, firmly grasp the closed end of the c‑clip and pull away from the shaft until it is free from the shaft.

CRIMP RINGS

What is a crimp ring?

Crimp rings, also called crimp circlips, are a "C" shaped wire formed retaining ring installed axially on a grooved shaft or rod. The gap at the opening of the ring allows for radial installation and is crimped closed to provide secure fitment to its mating part. Since crimp rings are manufactured from material that lacks spring‑like properties, they do not return to their original shape when bent and should not be reused once removed.

How do I install and remove crimp rings?

Crimp rings, or crimp circlips, can be found in a variety of applications such as lock cylinders. They can be installed using basic hand tools such as standard pliers.

To install, slide the uncrimped ring radially into the desired shaft groove. Next, use the pliers to crimp the ring closed, bringing the open ends of the ring together. This provides secure, 360‑degree contact to the shaft surface.

To remove a crimp ring, a standard screwdriver or pick will be needed. First, find the gap or opening of the crimp ring where the two ends of the ring are close together. Next, use your screwdriver, pick, or other flat tipped tool to spread the ends of the ring farther apart to a point that is wider than the diameter of the shaft it is installed on. Once the gap is to a sufficient width, push the ring out of the groove, away from the shaft. Since the crimp ring is made from material that lacks spring‑like qualities, the ends will not spring back together. This also requires the ring to be replaced with a new one after removal.

Where can I buy crimp rings?

These niche, hard‑to‑find fasteners are available at G.L. Huyett! As the master distributor and manufacturer of non‑threaded fasteners, G.L. Huyett carries a wide range of unique, hard‑to‑find fasteners. If you don't see what you're looking for, give our friendly, experienced Sales team a call to help you find the right solution for your application!

D RINGS

What is a D‑Ring and how do they work?

D‑Rings are simple, sturdy, and inexpensive wire form fasteners identified by their "D" shape. The smooth edgeless design provides a strong, durable anchor point for use with tarps, tents, collars, straps, belts, and more. D‑Rings are a great choice over circular rings when limited material movement is desired. The corners of a D‑Ring limit slide through whereas circular rings allow sliding around the entire circumference of the ring.

Where can I buy D‑Rings?

G.L. Huyett is a master distributor and manufacturer of wire form retainers. With one of the largest inventories in the industry, we have a wide selection of D‑Rings to fit a variety of applications. If you do not see what you are looking for, contact us to speak with our friendly, experienced Sales team!

E‑CLIPS

What is an E‑Clip?

E‑clips, also known as E‑rings, are three pronged, stamped clips that fit into machined grooves of smaller diameter tubes and shafts. E‑clips are installed radially and have a wider shoulder than their C‑clip counterparts. This wider shoulder provides a larger retaining area, yielding higher thrust load capacities.

How to install and remove

E‑clips, or E‑rings, can be installed radially using an applicator or simple hand tools. To install, insert the closed end of the E‑clip into opening of the applicator, leaving the open ends of the clip facing away from the applicator. Next, while still seated in the applicator, position the open ends of the clip in the groove of the shaft and firmly press into place. Inspect the clip to ensure it is seated evenly and securely in place. E‑clips can also be installed using automated equipment in high capacity assembly applications.

Removing an E‑ring can be accomplished using simple hand tools. Using a pair of needle‑nose pliers, firmly grasp the closed end of the c‑clip and pull away from the shaft until it is free from the shaft.

GRIP RINGS

What is a grip ring and how is it installed?

Radial grip rings, also called RG Shaft Rings, are a stamped self‑locking retaining ring that is radially assembled to shaft applications such as the bars on expandable security gates. Due to their self‑locking design, radial grip rings can be installed on shafts with or without a machined groove.

Installing grip rings is a fairly simple process and can be done without any special tools. To install, position the ring at a 90‑degree angle to the desired position and push it down the plane of the shaft into the groove. For grooveless applications, push the ring down the shaft to the desired location.

HOG RINGS

What is a hog ring and what are they used for?

Hog rings are a handy and tough fastener for applications such as sealing sausage casings, joining mesh or wire cages, fastening wire to fences, or the manufacture and maintenance of upholstered goods. G.L. Huyett is proud to supply this staple hardware of the meat packing industry and other professions. Hog rings hold a firm grip that is unlikely to fail and are generally more secure than nails or staples.

How to use hog ring pliers

Hog ring pliers are a specialty tool designed to install hog ring staples. Grooves are machined into the jaws of the pliers providing a recess for the rings to rest.

To use, open the pliers so that the jaws present a wide gap. Place the hog ring into the grooves of the jaws with the opening of the ring facing the same direction as the pliers. To close the ring, simply squeeze the plier handle to shut the jaws of the pliers. This action closes the ring fastening it securely to the desired component.

HOUSING RINGS

What is a housing ring?

Housing rings, or HO rings, are axially assembled internal retaining rings made from zinc plated spring steel that is installed with retaining ring pliers into a housing or bore. HO rings are designed with a taper to provide constant pressure against axles, gears, and bearings inside machinery housings.

How to install and remove housing rings

Housing rings, or HO rings, are axially installed in the grooves of housings or bores. The open section of the ring is designed with two lugs, each having a small diameter hole, which provide a leverage point for use with retaining ring pliers.

To install HO rings, insert the jaw tips of the retaining ring pliers into the lug holes of the ring. Next, close the jaws together decreasing the diameter of the ring slightly smaller than the housing it is being installed in. Once the ring is a small enough diameter, seat the ring into the groove of the housing and spread the jaws of the pliers apart. Check the circumference of the ring to ensure that it is seated securely and evenly in the groove.

To remove the housing ring, insert the jaw tips of the retaining ring pliers into the lug holes. Compress the ring until it has reached a diameter that is smaller than the housing walls and lift out.

How to Measure an Internal Housing Ring

Transcript: Let's measure an internal housing ring. They're really easy to measure. The first thing you want to measure on one is the OD at its widest point. And then we want to measure the thickness of the part. With these two measurements, you can easily identify an internal housing ring. Thanks for watching!

How to Measure an External Housing Ring

Transcript: Let's measure an external housing ring. They're really simple to measure. The first thing that you want to do is measure from the widest point of the ID. Then you want to measure the thickness of the ring. With these two measurements, you can easily identify an external housing ring. Thanks for watching!

INTERLOCKING RINGS

What is an interlocking retaining ring?

Interlocking rings are re‑usable, radially‑assembled retaining rings composed of two identical semicircular halves. They are held together by interlocking prongs that latch into a groove of a shaft. Their symmetrical shape dynamically "balances" the part, which allows them to effectively withstand high speed rotation.

How to install and remove interlocking retaining rings

Interlocking retaining rings are a radially installed, two piece retaining ring. To simplify installation, build a v‑block to help hold a section of the ring and shaft in place. First, place one half of the retaining ring on the shaft by positioning the ring at a 90‑degree angle to the shaft and pushing onto the desired location. Next, rest the shaft and ring assembly in the v‑block with the opening of the ring half facing upward.

Take the second half of the ring and position it on the shaft so that it begins to lock into its other half. The tension from being partially installed should allow the ring to stand on its own. To mate the retaining ring halves, hold a wooden block so that it makes contact with the half to be installed. Tap the block with a hammer to force the ring down into its other half. Continue tapping until the two halves are locked into place, providing a secure 360‑degree fit around the shaft.

Removing an interlocking ring from a shaft can be completed using simple hand tools. First, insert the end of a standard screwdriver or other similar flat tapered hand tool into the recess provided by the two locking halves. Pry the overlapping end of one of the ring halves up and over its counterpart until it has cleared the locking tab. Once clear, the ring will be able to rock out and away from the shaft.

LOCK NUTS

What is a bearing lock nut?

Bearing lock nuts, sometimes called shaft locknuts or bearing retaining nuts, are utilized to secure bearings onto a shaft and are designed to prevent the loosening of components due to vibration and rotation. Bearing lock nuts possess a different appearance from traditional hex lock nuts. Bearing lock nuts are typically rounded on the outside with keyed slots. This design requires a special tool called a spanner wrench or socket to be removed or installed. Bearing lock nuts are used in a wide variety of applications including the automotive and agriculture industries.

How to remove a bearing lock nut

Bearing lock nuts are a specialty fastener with a wide flange and machined slots on its outside face. These machined slots are designed to allow the fastener to be removed by a spanner wrench or socket. A spanner wrench (or socket) has tangs that fit into the corresponding slots of the bearing nut. To remove the nut, fit the wrench in the grooves of the nut and turn counter‑clockwise to remove.

LOCK WASHERS

What is a lock washer and how does it work?

A lock washer is a metal spacer that is designed to reduce the loosening of bolts and screws from their mating assembly. Lock washers come in a variety of types, the most common being split and toothed washers. The spring tension of these washers prevents loosening by creating pressure against a fastener's threads and its mating part. Split lock washers are a helically split ring whose open ends dig into its partnering fastener and joining material to reduce counter‑clockwise rotation. Toothed washer varieties are available with either internal or external teeth, also called tangs. When a screw or bolt is tightened down onto these washers, the tangs "bite" into the fastened material with moderate spring resistance against the fastener reducing the likelihood of loosening caused by vibrations.

POODLE CLIPS

What is a poodle clip?

Poodle clips, sometimes called PO‑Clips, are an external, radially‑assembled, heavy duty ring with shoulders or "ears" that resemble that of a poodle dog. The large shoulders and thicker material is larger than standard E‑Clips, offering extra retention surface against the retained part.

How to install and remove poodle clips

Poodle clips are a reusable clip that can be installed radially on a shaft using an applicator or standard pliers and screwdriver. To install, grasp the closed end of the clip with pliers and align the opening of the clip 90‑degrees to the desired shaft location. Push the clip onto the shaft until the ears are seated firmly in the shaft groove or against the shaft surface.

Removing a poodle clip can be accomplished using a standard screwdriver or othered tapered flat ended tool. A small space is provided at the closed end of the clip that allows the screwdriver to be placed between the shaft and the clip. With the tip of the screwdriver placed in the space, push the clip away from the shaft until its ears have cleared the shaft's surface.

PRONG LOCKED RINGS

What is a prong locked ring?

Prong locked rings, sometimes called EL Clips, are a variation of a bowed E‑Clip with prongs that secure the clip into place. This radially‑installed part functions as both a shoulder and spring due to its curved shape and prongs. High thrust load capacity and unique design make this a good retainer against rotating parts.

How to install and remove a prong locked ring

Installing an EL Clip does not take any special tools. However, an applicator or needle‑nose pliers can be used to ease installation. To install an EL Clip with needle‑nose pliers, grasp the closed end of the clip with the pliers and position the clip at a 90‑degree angle to the desired shaft. Once the clip is aligned to its desired location, push it onto the shaft.

To remove a prong locked ring, needle‑nose pliers can ease the process. Grasp the closed end of the clip with the pliers and pull back away from the shaft. A flat head screwdriver can also be used to remove a prong locked clip. Position the screwdriver against the open end of the EL Clip and push, forcing the clip away from the shaft.

PUSH-ON RINGS

How to install push on rings

Push‑On Rings are an axially installed, self‑locking retaining ring that applies frictional force against a shaft or housing to hold a mechanical component in place. Installing a push‑on ring is a simple process. First, ensure the ring you are installing is the right size. The tangs from the ring should slightly grip the shaft or bore it is being placed on, leaving a slight indentation into its mating part. In most cases, push on retaining rings can be installed by hand. Sometimes simple tools, like a socket, are needed for an easier install. To install, place the ring over the shaft or in the bore and push with even pressure across the retainer. If using a socket to install the ring, ensure that the socket is as close to the same size of the ring as possible without being larger. A larger socket may cause interference with the walls of a bore or housing for internal applications.

RECTANGULAR WIRE RINGS

How to install rectangular wire retaining rings

Rectangular wire rings are a rectangle section wire retaining ring that is axially installed onto a shaft using retaining ring pliers. Retaining ring pliers are designed to widen the gap of the ring temporarily giving it a wider diameter for fitment over a shaft.

To install, place the jaws of the pliers in the gap and spread them until the ring is a slightly larger diameter than the shaft it's being installed on. Next, slide the ring down the shaft to the desired groove or location and close the jaws. The ring will return to its original shape, providing a secure fit around the shaft.

Removing rectangular wire rings can be accomplished by simply performing the installation process in reverse. Insert the jaws of the retaining ring pliers into the gap of the wire ring. Spread the jaws apart until the ring's diameter is slightly larger than the shaft and slide the ring off the shaft.

ROUND WIRE RINGS

How to install round wire retaining rings

Round wire rings are a round section wire retaining ring that is axially installed onto a shaft using retaining ring pliers. Retaining ring pliers are designed to widen the gap of the ring temporarily giving it a wider diameter for fitment over a shaft.

To install, place the jaws of the pliers in the gap and spread them until the ring is a slightly larger diameter than the shaft it's being installed on. Next, slide the ring down the shaft to the desired groove or location and close the jaws. The ring will return to its original shape, providing a secure fit around the shaft.

Removing round wire rings can be accomplished by simply performing the installation process in reverse. Insert the jaws of the retaining ring pliers into the gap of the wire ring. Spread the jaws apart until the ring's diameter is slightly larger than the shaft and slide the ring off the shaft.

SNAP RINGS

What is a snap ring?

Snap rings, sometimes referred to as circlips or seeger rings, are a stamped tapered section retaining ring. These axially installed rings are often used in external applications to secure parts on grooved shafts, pins, or studs. The protruding section of the ring provides a shoulder for retaining parts, reducing cost of machining shoulders. Retaining rings are found in a variety of applications including automotive transmissions and hub assemblies.

How to install and remove a retaining ring

Snap rings, or circlips, can be installed internally or externally in grooves of shafts, bores, and housings using retaining ring pliers.

Internal Snap Rings:

Internally installed snap rings are designed with lugs at the opening of the ring. These lugs protrude toward the inside diameter of the ring to avoid interference with the bore or housing wall.

To install, insert the jaws of the retaining ring pliers into the holes provided in the lugs. Close the jaws until the ring diameter is slightly smaller than the housing or bore it is being installed in. Once the ring is in its desired location, release the jaws to allow the ring to return to its normal state. Inspect the circumference of the ring to ensure that it is seated securely and evenly in the machined groove.

To remove internal snap rings, insert the jaw tips of the retaining ring pliers into the notches of the ring. Compress the ring until it has reached a diameter that is smaller than the housing walls and lift out.

External Snap Rings:

Externally installed snap rings are also designed with lugs at the opening of the ring. These lugs protrude toward the outside diameter of the ring to provide even, 360‑degree contact with the shaft groove.

To install external snap rings, place the jaws of the pliers into lug holes and spread the jaws until the ring is a slightly larger diameter than the shaft it's being installed on. Next, slide the ring down the shaft to the desired groove and close the jaws. The ring will return to its original shape, providing a secure fit around the shaft.

To remove external snap rings, insert the jaws of the retaining ring pliers into the lug holes provided. Spread the jaws apart until the ring's diameter is slightly larger than the shaft and slide the ring off the shaft.

SPIRAL RINGS

How to install spiral rings

Spiral retaining rings are commonly used for shafts (external), housing/bores (internal), and bearing retention — or any application that requires 360‑degree contact with a groove and shoulder of the assembling part. Installing the ring does not require any special tools. Spiral rings can be installed either by hand or by automated tools. To install spiral rings, separate the coils and insert the exposed end of the ring into the shaft or housing groove. Next, wind the ring until the coils are closed and the ring is seated evenly in the desired groove.

SPLIT RINGS

How to open split rings

A split ring is a metal, wire formed ring that consists of two complete turns of a helix pressed flat together. The most common method of opening split rings is by separating the coils by hand, however for heavier duty rings, this method can be troublesome. Needle‑nose pliers are a great alternative. To open, secure the ring by hand or in a vice and grasp the exposed end of the ring where the coil ends with the pliers. Carefully pull the end of the ring away to create a gap in the coil. To keep the split ring open, wedge one of the plier jaws in the coil leaving the gap between the end of the ring and the rest of the coil.

SQUARE WIRE RINGS

How to install square wire retaining rings

Square wire rings are a square section wire retaining ring that is axially installed onto a shaft using retaining ring pliers. Retaining ring pliers are designed to widen the gap of the ring temporarily giving it a wider diameter for fitment over a shaft.

To install, place the jaws of the pliers in the gap and spread them until the ring is a slightly larger diameter than the shaft it's being installed on. Next, slide the ring down the shaft to the desired groove or location and close the jaws. The ring will return to its original shape, providing a secure fit around the shaft.

Removing square wire rings can be accomplished by simply performing the installation process in reverse. Insert the jaws of the retaining ring pliers into the gap of the wire ring. Spread the jaws apart until the ring's diameter is slightly larger than the shaft and slide the ring off the shaft.

UPHOLSTERY RINGS

How to install and remove upholstery hog rings

Upholstery Rings, commonly called hog rings, are u‑shaped rings bent during installation to secure two objects together. Once installed, they feature a firm grip that is unlikely to work itself loose and are generally more secure than nails or staples.

To ease installation, bent or straight hog ring pliers are recommended. Simply insert the upholstery ring into the grooves of the pliers with the ring opening facing outward. With the ring in the pliers, position the ring opening over the desired application and squeeze the plier handles to shut the ring. Since upholstery rings are not intended to be reused, the quickest and simplest method of removal is to cut the ring free using a pair of side cutting pliers.

X-RINGS

What is an X‑Ring and how is it installed?

X‑Rings, or X retaining fasteners, are a heavier constructed crimp style fastener commonly used in grooved shaft assemblies providing 360‑degree closure. Installation of X‑Rings does not require any special tools. To install, position the ring at a 90‑degree angle to the desired shaft and push it into the groove. For grooveless applications, push the ring down the shaft to the desired location.

Once the ring is seated in its proper position, squeeze the open end of the ring shut with standard pliers. This creates a secure, 360‑degree closure around the shaft. To remove the X‑Ring, squeeze the tangs opposite of the open end together. This will create a gap at the opening of the ring sufficient enough for removal. Since X‑Rings are not made of spring metal, they are weakened after removal and should not be re‑used.