Pins and Wire Forms at Huyett.com
 

G.L. Huyett is a master distributor offering a wide variety of pins for your fastening needs. If you don't find what you're looking for here, we also manufacture small run specials to your specifications. Contact us to speak with our friendly, experienced Sales team to find just the right pin for you!

 

Bent Pins

Bent Pins

Bent pins, also known as bent hitch pins, are metal pins with one straight end and a 25° angle bent arm at the opposite end. This low cost pin is often used to temporarily join pieces of equipment together that are frequently disconnected and reconnected. Our bent pins come drilled standard to be used with a wire form pin (bridge pin or cotter pin) to hold it in place during use. By special order, a groove can be turned at the end allowing the pin to be secured using a retaining ring. A wide range of lengths and diameters can be ordered online from G.L. Huyett.

  • Offered in low carbon or stainless steel materials
  • Optional zinc clear finish available
  • Effective lengths range from 2‑1/8" to 7‑1/4"
  • A durable, versatile, and economical solution for many agricultural and industrial applications

Bridge Pins

Bridge Pins

Bridge pins ‑ also referred to as R-Clips, R-Keys, Hitch Pin Clips ‑ are commonly used to secure the ends of hitch pins and clevis pins by being inserted into a hole or groove. The indentation of these pins along with the straight edge ensures secure attachment to the desired parts of equipment. Most hitch pin clips are manufactured from spring wire or stainless steel, however specialty materials such as marine grade 316 stainless steel can also be used. G.L. Huyett’s bridge pins come in a variety of sizes and styles that will work towards any project. View our Pin Reference Guide to find the perfect bridge pin for your project or contact us with any questions you may have.

  • Available in steel zinc and stainless steel
  • Offered in corrosion resistant zinc clear and zinc yellow
  • Easily tethered to prevent loss

Clevis Pins

Clevis Pins

Clevis pins are one of the components of a three‑piece clevis fastener system. Clevis pins are used as a quick and secure fastener in place of bolts and rivets. Designed with both a flat or domed head on one end and cross-hole at the other, a clevis pin is inserted through the holes at the pronged ends of a clevis and is kept in place by a cotter pin. Similar to bolts and rivets, clevis pins are used as quick, secure, and cost-effective fasteners; however, they can hold much more load tension of pulling forces when connecting two structural units. Clevis pins are an essential closure for anchor and chain shackles. Compatible with various wire form pins and safety pins, G.L. Huyett offers a large selection of high‑quality clevis pins to meet your application needs.

  • Quick, secure fastener for agricultural and industrial applications
  • Available in plain, zinc clear, zinc yellow, and stainless steel
  • Universal, or adjustable, clevis pin can be reused in a variety of applications

Cotter Pins

Cotter Pins

Cotter pins, also known as split pins and cotter keys, are a steel formed pin inserted into a drilled hole of a clevis pin, shaft, or other mating assembly. The pin has a split end that is separated to secure the part after insertion. Inserting cotter pins is a simple process, as they can be installed quickly and with no special tools. Most cotter pins are able to be easily removed and reused, saving time and money. G.L. Huyett offers a massive selection of versatile cotter pins in a wide range of materials, finishes, and sizes, as well as a variety of types including circle, clinch, bow‑tie, hammerlock, humped, ring, T-head, and self‑locking cotter pins.

  • Low-cost, secure, and highly versatile fasteners
  • Offered in a wide variety of types, sizes, and finishes
  • Multiple prong types available for unique applications
  • Extended prongs allow for easier separation
  • Square prongs provide a cleaner visual appearance

Detent Pins

Detent Pins

Detent pins, also known as cotter less hitch pins or quick release pins, are designed for temporary quick disconnect operations or any application that requires rapid, frequent, and manual assembly and disassembly of a particular object. The pin has a ball bearing on one end with a steel spring that depresses and springs the ball out to lock the pin into place. G.L. Huyett offers a huge selection of steel and brass pins. Our detent pins are durable have a wide range of applications in fastening, locating, and alignment.

  • Available in brass, carbon steel, and stainless steel materials
  • Carbon steel pins offered in corrosion resistant yellow and clear zinc
  • Useful in blind hole or repetitive use applications

Dowel Pins

Dowel Pins

Dowel pins are short cylindrical rods that are made up of either metal, plastic, or wood. These pins are used to align or join two or more components in machinery, construction, and furniture making. They have many uses, such as aligning machine components during assembly for consistent results or joining stone and concrete in masonry. G.L. Huyett’s catalog of dowel pins comes in an abundance of end designs, micro-finishes, and features. We provide dowel pins in common materials like steel, brass, and aluminum and offer a wide selection of sizes, including the prevailing standard for imperial (ASME B18.8.2) and metric (DIN) sizes.

  • Available in carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and brass
  • Carbon steel pins are offered in passivated, zinc clear, and black oxide finishes
  • Designed with increased shear strength to absorb lateral stress

Grip Clips

Grip Clips

Grip clips, more commonly referred to as locking twist pins, are wire formed pins used to secure a variety of hitch pins, headless pins, and bent pins. The straight wire of the clip is inserted into the hole of a pin and rotated counterclockwise allowing the curved wire to lock the clip into position. These reusable locking twist pins can be a viable alternative to standard bridge pins when a more secure attachment is desired.

  • Offered in corrosion resistant Zinc Clear
  • Compatible with most grooved pins
  • Can typically be used interchangeably with common bridge pins

Groove Pins

Groove Pins

Grooved pins, or grooved dowel pins, are solid press fit fasteners that have three parallel grooves. The grooves, sometimes defined as flutes, displace material in the pin creating a void. When the pin is pressed into a hole, the grooves pinch shut creating tension that locks the pin in place. Grooved dowel pins are used in many common applications, such as locking devices, pivots, levers, or locating elements.

  • Available in 300, 316, and 416 stainless steel, alloy steel, aluminum, carbon steel, and low carbon steel
  • Offered in black oxide, passivated, zinc clear, and zinc yellow corrosion resistant finishes
  • A wide range of designs are available to fit a variety of applications
  • Ideal for applications requiring superior locking effects and ease of assembly

Hair Pins

Hair Pins

Hair Pins—also commonly referred to as Hitch Hair Pins or Hairpin Cotter Pins—are frequently used to secure grooved clevis pins, headless pins, and shafts while keeping equipment aligned. The high shoulder design allows the pin to fit a variety of sizes, working well with larger diameter pins.

  • Offered in corrosion resistant Zinc Clear and Zinc Yellow finishes
  • Available in stainless steel and MB spring wire
  • Often used alongside hitch pins
  • Increased surface contact makes these pins great for grooved pin and shaft applications

Headless Pins

Headless Pins

Headless pins are solid pins similar to hitch pins but without a flanged head. These pins are either grooved, drilled, or grooved and drilled at each chamfered end. Headless Pins are held in place by wire rings, wire formed pins such as bridge pins that facilitate quick assembly/disassembly, or retaining rings such as E‑clips that produce greater thrust load ratings than wire rings. The versatile headless design is typically used in blind holes or on yokes. As the head and body of the pins are the same diameter, either end can be installed making them ideal for use in automated assembly and applications with high lateral force.

  • Made in 300 series stainless steel, and low and medium carbon steel
  • Offered in plain and clear zinc finishes
  • Grooved design allows for better lateral resistance and more precise effective length control

Hitch Pins

Hitch Pins

Hitch Pins, sometimes called trailer pins, are designed with either a swivel handle or a fixed PVC coated handle. The pin is secured by inserting a bridge pin or lynch pin into a hole opposite of the handle. Hitch pins are often used for securing trailer couplers as well as various turf and agricultural implements. While hitch pins are used in many of the same applications as bent pins, they are most commonly found in light duty commercial and agricultural environments where frequent disconnecting is needed.

  • Available in Zinc Yellow, Zinc Clear, and black powder coat finishes
  • Available swivel lock may eliminate the need for a mating part to secure the pin
  • Can be used with tethers to prevent loss of hardware
  • Great for securing trailers, implements, and more

Lynch Pins

Lynch Pins

Lynch Pins ‑ also commonly referred to as quick pins or linchpins ‑ are a self-locking pin inserted crosswise as through the end of an axle or shaft. These fasteners securely keep objects from sliding off its axle. G.L.  Huyett offers a variety of light‑duty and heavy duty carbon steel lynch pins. Lynch Pins are often used to attach tractor implements, secure trailer couplers or doors, among a variety of other applications where quick connecting/disconnecting between mating parts is desired.

  • Offered in corrosion resistant Yellow Zinc, Clear Zinc, and Black Phosphate finishes
  • Heavy Duty rings available for extreme applications
  • Attached self‑locking ring snaps down firmly to hold the part securely in place
  • Tether Lanyards available to prevent lost hardware

Positive Lock Pins

Positive Lock Pins

Positive Lock Pins, or Ball Lock Pins, are self‑locking, quick release pins manufactured through sophisticated production techniques using precision materials. The large protruding button at the grip of the pin provides an easily‑accessible method to release the detent balls, allowing the pin to be quickly inserted and removed. The convenient feature of its single‑piece design can withstand highly demanding applications under repetitive usage, making Positive Lock Pins a smart choice for fastening, locating, and aligning parts.

  • Available in stainless steel and alloy steel
  • Optional corrosion resistant finishes in cadmium or passivated
  • Body styles offered in button head, L‑handle, T‑handle, and ring grip
  • Can be attached to a tether to prevent lost hardware

Safety Pins

Safety Pins

Industrial Safety Pins are quick, reusable, self‑securing when engaged, and easy to use pins. Tension is created through a coiled or uncoiled wire creating a positive lock. Industrial Safety Pins can be used for applications such as retaining clevis pins in anchor shackle systems, and other circumstances where an extra secure, but easy to detach pin is beneficial. G.L. Huyett offers versatile safety pins in various diameters and tensions.

  • Heavy duty Safety Pins provide extra spring tension
  • Available in clear zinc and stainless steel finishes
  • Steel tethers can be used to prevent lost hardware

Snap Pins

Snap Pins

Snap Pins, otherwise known as snapper pins or wire lock pins, are similar in design to hitch pins but with the added feature of a pivoting spring wire attached at the head. When the pin is inserted into a part, the spring wire spans over the part, snapping around the end of the pin securing it in place. Snap pins are used in a wide variety of applications in agricultural and commercial industries.

  • Offered in Black Oxide, Passivated, Zinc Clear, and Zinc Yellow finishes
  • Round, square, and coiled wire types available
  • Single wire and heavy duty double wire options

Spring Pins

Spring Pins

Spring Pins, sometimes referred to as slotted pins, rolled pins or coiled rolled pins, are hollow, cylindrical tube‑style press fit fasteners with chamfered ends. Rolled pins are used as locking devices, positioning points, anti‑chafing surfaces, shafts, or sleeves for wiring. Usage is limited only by your imagination and technological capabilities. Slotted pins are also known as roll pins or spring pins. Coiled roll pins are sometimes called spiral pins. G.L. Huyett’s large assortment of spring pins are available in a variety of materials, finishes, and sizes.

  • Available in alloy steel, carbon steel, beryllium copper, and stainless steel
  • Offered in clear zinc, yellow zinc, black zinc, cadmium, lightly oiled, passivated, phosphate, and black oxide
  • A multitude of size options are available to fit almost any application
  • Spring pins can be doubled up for added shear strength

Taper Pins

Taper Pins

Tapered pins are arguably one of the simplest pin designs available, and along with dowel pins, are the oldest. Tapered pins are turned from bar stock to varying tolerances depending on the specification. This production technique is slower than heading and grinding from which dowel pins are manufactured. It is also slower than rolling steel pins (aka rolled pins), thus the popularity and use of tapered pins is declining. The diameter at the small end of ASME Taper Pins is a function of the length and should be specified as a reference dimension for determining drilled hole size. It shall be computed by multiplying the nominal length of pin by the factor 0.2083 and subtracting the result from the basic pin diameter.

  • Offered in carbon steel, alloy steel, Monel®, and a variety of stainless steel grades
  • Available in corrosion resistant zinc clear and zinc yellow
  • Highly precise locating pin allows for repeatable firm seat and exact location when reinserted after disassembly

Tethers

Tethers

Tethers, also called lanyards, are simple metal or composite cables with loops at each end. They can be attached to any object for added security and are frequently used in the commercial and agricultural industry to provide attachment between a pin and its mating part to minimize lost hardware. One end can be anchored to a fixed part for permanent location when desired.

  • Made in steel, stainless steel, and nylon materials
  • Simple, durable design
  • Reduces chance of hardware loss to save time and money


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
By Pin Type

BRIDGE PINS

Where can I buy bridge pins?

G.L. Huyett is the master distributor of pins offering a complete line of bridge pins. If you don’t find what you are looking for, contact us to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team to find the right pin specific to your needs!

How to remove and install bridge pins

Bridge pins, commonly referred to as hitch pin clips or R‑clips, are a simple fastener to install and uninstall. The large looped design of the pin provides a secure point of contact to grasp either by hand or with a pair of pliers or other simple tool. The design also allows the pin to be used with either grooved or drilled hitch pins, clevis pins, and other similar pins and shafts.

Drilled Applications:

  1. To install bridge pins (hitch pin clips) for drilled applications, grasp the large loop of the pin and insert the end of straight side of the pin into the hole. Push the straight end through the hole until the small indention of the pin rests over top of the part.
  2. To remove the pin, grasp the large loop of the pin and pull backward out of the part the pin is inserted into. Resistance will be experienced due to pressure the top wire of the pin places on the part. Continue to pull the hitch pin clip backward until it is completely free of the part.

Grooved Applications:

  1. To install bridge pins (hitch pin clips) for grooved applications, grasp the large loop of the pin and position the split wires of the pin into the groove. Push the pin forward until the small indention of the pin rests overtop of the part and the straight wire is resting under the part.
  2. To remove the pin, grasp the large loop of the pin and pull backward out of the part the pin is inserted into. Resistance will be experienced due to pressure the top wire of the pin places on the part. Continue to pull the hitch pin clip backward until it is completely free of the part.

How to measure an R‑Clip or Bridge Pin

Transcript: Bridge Pins are available in a variety of shapes and sizes. The great thing about bridge pins are that they're all measured the same way. Let's measure one. The first thing you're going to want to measure on a bridge pin is the wire diameter. You can measure that from anywhere on the pin that you’d like. In this case I will measure from the head of the pin. There I've got my wire diameter. Now I’ll want to measure the length. Where you measure the length on a bridge pin, you're going to measure from end to end. What you want to do is just set your calipers there and get your length measurement, and there you have it! Bridge pins are just that simple to measure. Thanks for watching!

CLEVIS PINS

Where can I buy a clevis pin?

G.L. Huyett is the master distributor and manufacturer of non‑threaded fasteners including clevis pins. G.L. Huyett manufactures a wide variety of clevis pins in any shape, size, finish, and grade. For custom applications, call our friendly and experienced sales team to help you build a clevis pin to your specifications.

What is a clevis pin used for?

Clevis pins are often used in agricultural and power equipment where there are non‑precise movements. Used in moving linkages as a fulcrum or pivot, they are considered a low cost quick disconnect feature. Clevis pins come in many shapes, styles, and materials. While using a bolt may sometimes seem to be an adequate alternative, bolts are designed to handle tension loads while clevis pins are designed for shearing loads.

Clevis and Bent Pins

Are clevis pins hardened?

The hardness of clevis pins is measured by the Rockwell scale which is based on the indentation hardness of the material it is made of. Clevis pins are most commonly made from carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass, each having their own respective Rockwell hardness. Clevis pins can be case hardened, thus hardening the outer surface of this pin. Case hardened pins are typically indicated with an "H" stamped on the head.

How to measure a Clevis Pin

Transcript: How do I measure and identify a clevis pin? Clevis pins are really simple to identify. This is a standard clevis pin here. It’s headed on one end and has a hole on the other one to put your fastener in. This is another clevis pin that we also offer. This is called a universal or an adjustable clevis pin. As you see, again, it’s headed on one end and has multiple holes on this one. That way you can use it at multiple lengths. Measuring a clevis pin is really simple. There’s a lot of measurements to it but only two that really matter. One is going to be your diameter. You’re going to take your calipers, and you’re going to put that into the jaws of the caliper and you’re going to get a good reading on the diameter. And then you’re going to take your calipers, and you’re going to do it just a little bit different. Down here, you see this. This is called a depth bar or depth gauge. I want to measure the length of the clevis pin, so I’m going to put that right against the bar and as you see, I’m going to slide that bar right down to the end of the pin until I’ve got a good reading. And it is really, really that simple on how to identify and measure a clevis pin. Thanks for watching!

COTTER PINS

Where can I buy cotter pins?

G.L. Huyett is the master distributor of cotter pins and cotter pin assortments with the most comprehensive assortment in the industry. If you don't find what you're looking for, head on over to our "About" page for information on how to contact our friendly, experienced sales team!

What is a cotter pin?

Cotter pins, also known as split pins and cotter keys, are a steel formed pin inserted into a drilled hole of a clevis pin, shaft, or other mating assembly. The pin has a split end that is separated to secure the part after insertion. Inserting cotter pins is a simple process, as they can be installed quickly and with no special tools. Most cotter pins are able to be easily removed and reused, saving time and money. G.L. Huyett offers a massive selection of versatile cotter pins in a wide range of materials, finishes, and sizes, as well as a variety of types including circle, clinch, bow‑tie, hammerlock, humped, ring, T‑head, and self‑locking cotter pins.

Cotter Pin

How to measure a Cotter Pin

Transcript: Let's measure a cotter pin. Cotter pins are really easy to measure. There's only two measurements that are vital. One of them is the diameter of the pin and the other is the effective length of the pin. To measure a diameter you want to make sure that you measure from a point where the metals are together and you want to take your calipers and get them down to that point on the cotter pin. And there we've got our diameter. Then we want to measure the effective length. The effective length is going to be the shorter of the two tines on the pin, and you're going to hook into the one end. You're going to come up to where the cotter pin starts to bend right there, and there you've got the effective length. It's that easy to measure a cotter pin. Thanks for watching!

How to use a cotter pin ‑ Installation and removal

Cotter pins are a common solution for securing a large number of parts. To use, simply insert the split end of the pin through the drilled hole of a pin, shaft, or spindle until the prongs of the pin protrude out the other side. Next, separate the prongs to secure the pin in place.

To remove a cotter pin, bend the prongs back together making them as straight as possible and aligned with the head of the pin. Next, using a pair of pliers, grasp the head of the pin and pull. For stubborn cotter pins that may be rusted or seized, spray with penetrating oil and let soak for a short period of time before attempting to remove. Next, grasp the head of the pin with pliers and attempt to remove. If this method is ineffective, cut the prongs of the pin with a pair of side cutters as close to the hole in the shaft as possible. Next, take the tip of a small punch and place it at the split end of the pin and drive the pin backward out of the hole.

How to install / remove cotter pin with castle nut

Cotter pins and castle nuts are often paired together to securing hub and wheel assemblies. To install, torque the nut to a desired value and then rotate forward or backward to the nearest slot that aligns with the drilled hole in the shaft. Next, insert the cotter pin, split end first, into the drilled hole of the spindle until the prongs protrude out the opposite side. Split the prongs of the cotter pin to secure the pin and castle nut in place.

DETENT PINS

Where can I buy detent pins?

G.L. Huyett is the leading manufacturer and distributor of pins and wire form retainers including detent pins. Our broad selection of detent pins are available in metric and imperial sizes made in carbon steel, stainless steel, and brass. If you don't see what you are looking for, contact our friendly, experienced sales team today!

What is a detent pin and how do they work?

Detent pins, also known as cotterless hitch pins or quick release pins, are designed for temporary quick disconnect operations or any application that requires rapid, frequent, and manual assembly and disassembly of a particular object. The pin has a ball bearing on one end with a steel spring that depresses and springs the ball out to lock the pin into place. G.L. Huyett offers a huge selection of steel and brass pins.

Positive Lock Detent Pins

How to measure a Detent Pin

Detent pins are measured in the same manner as our positive lock pins. Check out our video below for a demonstration!

Transcript: Let’s measure a Positive Lock Pin. There are two types of positive lock pins. There’s your self-locking pin, and there’s your detent pin. The great thing about both of these is they’re measured the same way. Let’s measure one. The first thing that you want to measure on one of these pins is your diameter. And then you want to measure your effective length. Your effective length on this pin is going to be from under the head, or the ring in this case, to the top of the ball. It’s that simple to measure a positive lock pin. Thanks for watching!

DOWEL PINS

Where can I buy dowel pins?

Shop G.L. Huyett for all of your dowel pin needs. G.L. Huyett has been the leading manufacturer and distributor for non‑threaded fasteners for over 100 years! If you don't find what you are looking for, contact us today to speak with our friendly, experienced, and knowledgeable sales team!

What is a dowel pin?

Dowel pins are short cylindrical rods made of either metal, plastic, or wood. These pins are used to align or join two or more components in machinery, construction, and furniture making. They have many uses, such as aligning machine components during assembly for consistent results or joining stone and concrete in masonry.

Dowel Pin
Hollow Dowel Pin
Pullout Dowel Pin

How to remove solid dowel pins

Dowel pins are a simple part that can be removed with basic hand tools. In most cases, the dowel is used as a guide for assembly and will have a protruding end after a part has been disassembled. To remove the dowel pin from a part, securely grasp the protruding end of the pin with a pair of pliers and pull outward. For stubborn dowel pins, a dowel pin puller can be used to effectively extract the pin from its mating part.

For applications where the dowel pin is flush to its mating part and its ends are visible on both sides of the mating part, a small punch and hammer can be used for removal. First, use a punch with a tip slightly smaller in diameter to the pin. Place the tip of the punch on the head of the pin and strike the end of the punch with a hammer. This will cause the pin to move out the opposite end of the hole it is in. Continue to strike the punch until the pin can be pulled out by hand or with a pair of pliers.

How to measure a Dowel Pin

Transcript: Dowel pins come in a variety of shapes and sizes. With the exception of the DIN 7 metric dowel pin, they all measure the same way. Let's measure one. The first thing you want to measure is your diameter and then you want to measure the overall length. The overall length on a dowel pin is measured from end to end. And it's that simple to measure a dowel pin. Thanks for watching!

How to measure a DIN 7 Dowel Pin

Transcript: What we have here is a DIN 7 metric dowel pin. I want to specify that it's a DIN 7 because DIN 7 is measured differently than standard dowel pins. Let's measure one. The first thing you want to measure on one is your diameter. And then when you measure the length, you're going to measure from edge to edge. By edge the edge that means you're measuring just to the edges and not the crown of the dowel pin, and it's that simple to measure a DIN 7 dowel pin. Thanks for watching!

GRIP CLIPS

Where can I buy grip clips?

G.L. Huyett has one of the largest selections of retaining clips in the industry, including unique varieties like grip clips, commonly called twist lock clips. Our twist lock clips are a great alternative to standard hitch pin clips when a more secure attachment is needed.

What is a grip clip?

Grip clips, more commonly referred to as locking twist pins, are wire formed, locking bridge pins used to secure a variety of hitch pins, headless pins, and bent pins. The straight wire of the clip is inserted into the hole of a pin and rotated counterclockwise allowing the curved wire to lock the clip into position. These reusable locking twist pins can be a viable alternative to standard bridge pins when a more secure attachment is desired.

HAIR PIN COTTER

Where can I buy hair pins?

G.L. Huyett is the master distributor of industrial hair pins. With one of the largest selections in the industry, G.L. Huyett has hair pins of almost every variety to fit your needs. If you don't see what you're looking for, give us a call to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team!

What is a hair pin?

Hair Pins ‑ also commonly referred to as Hitch Hair Pins or Hairpin Cotter Pins ‑ are frequently used to secure grooved clevis pins, headless pins, and shafts while keeping equipment aligned. The high shoulder design allows the pin to fit a variety of sizes, working well with larger diameter pins.

How to install hair pin cotter pins

Hair pins, also referred to as hitch hair pins or hairpin cotter pins, are a simple fastener that is primarily used for securing grooved pin applications. To install the hair pin, grasp the looped end of the pin and position the split end in the groove of the shaft, spindle, or pin to be secured. Push the hair pin forward until the first indentions of the pin rests overtop and underneath of the secured part. To remove, simply grasp the looped end of the hair pin and pull back until the pin is free from its mating part.

How to measure hair pin cotter pins

Hair pins can be measured by three values: the wire diameter, the pins eye diameter, and the overall pin length from end to end. To measure the wire diameter, use a caliper and adjust the jaws until they are touching the outside edges of the wire. For measuring pin length, open the jaws of the caliper so that one jaw touches closed end of the pin and the other touches the tip of the split end.

The last measurement of the hair pin is the eye diameter. The eye diameter is the inside distance between the two wires at their widest point of the second indentation. To measure the eye diameter, open the caliper jaws so that each jaw touches the inside surface of each wire.

For additional information on the different hair pin types G.L. Huyett offers, check out our online catalog.

HEADLESS CLEVIS PIN

Where can I buy headless clevis pins?

G.L. Huyett is the master distributor and manufacturer of non-threaded fasteners including clevis pins. G.L. Huyett manufactures a wide variety of clevis pins in any shape, size, finish, and grade. For custom applications, call our friendly and experienced sales team to help you build a clevis pin to your specifications.

What is a headless clevis pin?

Headless pins are solid pins similar to hitch pins but without a flanged head. These pins are either grooved, drilled, or grooved and drilled at each chamfered end. Headless Pins are held in place by wire rings, wire formed pins such as bridge pins that facilitate quick assembly/disassembly, or retaining rings such as E‑clips that produce greater thrust load ratings than wire rings. The versatile headless design is typically used in blind holes or on yokes. As the head and body of the pins are the same as the diameter, either end can be installed making them ideal for use in automated assembly and applications with high lateral force.

Headless Clevis Pin

How to measure a headless clevis pin

Calipers are one of the most accurate tools for measuring a headless clevis pin. To ensure you get the right pin for your application, measure the pin's diameter and overall length. Measuring the pin's effective length, the distance between the grooves or holes at each end of the pin, is also necessary.

HITCH PINS (BENT AND SWIVEL HANDLE)

Where do I buy hitch pins?

G.L. Huyett, the master distributor of non‑threaded fasteners, offers a complete line of bent pins and swivel hitch pins. If you don't find what you are looking for or have a unique application, contact us today to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team to find the right pin specific to your needs!

What size hitch pin is used for a 2 inch receiver?

Most hitch pins used for 2 inch receivers have an effective length of 2 7/8 inches and a diameter of 1/2 inch. While these sizes are the most common, it is a good idea to verify the measurements of your application to ensure you get a properly sized hitch pin that fits your needs the best.

How to measure a Hitch Pin

Transcript: Hitch pins come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The great thing about hitch pins is they’re all measured the same way. Let’s measure one. They’re very simple to measure. The first thing you want to do is measure your diameter. And then you want to measure the effective length. The effective length is from under the head to the top of the hole. There it is. It’s that simple to measure a hitch pin. Thanks for watching!

How to measure a Swivel Lock Hitch Pin

Transcript: Let’s measure a Swivel Lock Hitch Pin. They’re very easy to measure. You want to measure your diameter first. Then you want to measure your effective length. Your effective length on a swivel lock is going to be from under the head to where the top of the swivel comes out. It’s that simple to measure a swivel lock hitch pin. Thanks for watching!

How to measure a Bent Pin

Transcript: Let's measure a bent pin. Bent pins are easy to measure. The first thing you want to measure on one is the diameter, and then you want to measure the effective length. The effective length is from the first bend to the top of the hole. It's that easy to measure a bent pin. Thanks for watching!

LYNCH PINS

Where can I buy lynch pins?

Lynch pins can be purchased right here from G.L. Huyett, the master distributor of non-threaded fasteners with a wide variety of lynch pins to fit nearly any application.

What is a lynch pin?

Lynch pins, also commonly referred to as quick pins or linchpins, are a self‑locking pin inserted crosswise as through the end of an axle or shaft. These fasteners securely keep objects from sliding off the axle. Lynch pins are often used to attach tractor implements, secure trailer couplers or doors, among a variety of other applications where quick connecting / disconnecting between mating parts is desired.

How does a lynch pin work?

Lynch pins, sometimes spelled linchpins or linch pins, use an integrated spring‑tempered ring that snaps in place to secure the pin. After the pin is inserted into the hole of a mating part, the ring is snapped over the part securing the pin in place.

How to measure a Lynch Pin

Transcript: Let's measure a lynch pin. First thing you want to measure on a lynch pin is the diameter of the pin. And then we want to measure the effective length. The effective length is from under the head to the top of the ring. It's that simple to measure a lynch pin. Thanks for watching!

POSITIVE LOCK PINS

Where can I buy ball lock pins?

G.L. Huyett carries a variety of positive lock, or ball lock, pins. If you don't find what you are looking for or have a unique application, contact us today to speak with our friendly, experienced sales to team find the right part for your needs!

What is a positive (ball / quick release) lock pin?

Positive Lock Pins, or Ball Lock Pins, are self‑locking, quick release pins manufactured through sophisticated production techniques using precision materials. The large protruding button at the grip of the pin provides an easily-accessible method to release the detent balls, allowing the pin to be quickly inserted and removed. The convenient feature of its single‑piece design can withstand highly demanding applications under repetitive usage, making Positive Lock Pins a smart choice for fastening, locating, and aligning parts.

Button Head and T-Handle Pins

How do ball lock pins work?

Ball lock pins are designed with a metal precision ball protruding out on the side of the pin near the end of the pin shaft. The ball is supported by either a metal spring or rubber cylinder that allows the ball to be depressed into the pin when the pin is forced into a hole. As the ball end of the pin is pushed out the open end of the hole, the ball springs out to lock the pin in place. There are different varieties of ball lock pins, some of which release the ball by use of a button on the handle, and others that rely on force to depress the ball.

How to measure a Positive Lock Pin

Transcript: Let’s measure a Positive Lock Pin. There are two types of positive lock pins. There’s your self‑locking pin, and there’s your detent pin. The great thing about both of these is they’re measured the same way. Let’s measure one. The first thing that you want to measure on one of these pins is your diameter. And then you want to measure your effective length. Your effective length on this pin is going to be from under the head, or the ring in this case, to the top of the ball. It’s that simple to measure a positive lock pin. Thanks for watching!

SAFETY PINS

Where can I buy a safety pin?

G.L. Huyett has been the master distributor and manufacturer of non‑threaded fasteners for over 100 years! We have one of the largest and most comprehensive selections of safety pins in the industry. If you don't see what you're looking for or have a specific request, contact us today to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team.

What is a safety pin?

Industrial Safety Pins are quick, reusable, self‑securing when engaged, and easy to use pins. Tension is created through a coiled or uncoiled wire creating a positive lock. Industrial Safety Pins can be used for applications such as retaining clevis pins in anchor shackle systems, and other circumstances where an extra secure, but easy to detach pin is beneficial. G.L. Huyett offers versatile safety pins in various diameters and tensions.

What are safety pins made of?

Safety pins offered by G.L. Huyett are made from hard drawn spring wire with the option of a corrosion resistant zinc clear coating. Heavy duty safety pins made of heavier gauge wire are also available. Our heavy duty pins are also made from hard drawn spring wire, as well as 300 series stainless steel.

How to measure a safety pin

Safety pins have four distinct measurements: wire diameter, effective length, height, and overall length. The wire diameter is simply the wire thickness of the pin. The effective length is the usable open space of the pin when it is closed.

SNAP PINS

Where can I buy snap pins?

Snap pins can be purchased right here at G.L. Huyett! We are the master distributor of pin and wire form fasteners with one of the largest selections of these wire lock pins in the industry. If you don’t see what you are looking for and need a custom part, give us a call to speak with our friendly, experienced sales staff!

What is a snap pin?

Snap Pins, otherwise known as snapper pins or wire lock pins, are similar in design to hitch pins but with the added feature of a pivoting spring wire attached at the head. When the pin is inserted into a part, the spring wire spans over the part, snapping around the end of the pin securing it in place. Snap pins are used in a wide variety of applications in agricultural and commercial industries.

How do snap pins work?

Snap pins have an integrated spring attached to the pin head. After the pin is inserted into its mating part, the ring snaps over to lock the pin in place. This one piece design eliminates the need for a second, separate cotter to secure the pin in place.

How to measure a Snap Pin

Transcript: Snap pins, tab lock pins, and coil tension pins. Even though they come in a lot of different shapes and sizes, the great thing about them is they're all measured the same way. Let's measure one. The first thing you want to do on one of these is you want to measure your diameter. And then you want to measure your effective length. Your effective length on this pin is going to be from under the head to the top of the bale. This is considered your bale. They all will have a bale on them. It's that simple to measure a snap, tab lock pin, or a coil tension pin. Thanks for watching!

SPRING PINS

Where can I buy spring pins?

G.L. Huyett is your reliable source for high quality parts that meet or exceed ASME, ASTM, SAE and DIN standards. As the master distributer and manufacturer of pin and wire form fasteners, we carry one of the largest selections of spring pins in the industry. If you don’t see what you are looking for or require a custom part, contact us today to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team!

What is a spring pin?

Spring Pins, sometimes referred to as slotted pins, rolled pins or coiled rolled pins, are hollow, cylindrical tube-style press fit fasteners with chamfered ends. Rolled pins are used as locking devices, positioning points, anti‑chafing surfaces, shafts, or sleeves for wiring. Usage is limited only by your imagination and technological capabilities. Slotted pins are also known as roll pins or spring pins. Coiled roll pins are sometimes called spiral pins. G.L. Huyett’s large assortment of spring pins are available in a variety of materials, finishes, and sizes.

Coiled Spring Pins

How to install and remove a spring, coiled, and slotted pin

Installation:

There are several methods that can be used to install a spring pin. Which method is best depends on the environment, be it in field repairs or large production lines.

The simplest method of installing a spring pin is to use a hammer. First, line up the pin to the hole by hand. Next, tap the end of the pin with a hammer driving it into the hole. Special care needs to be made to not damage the pin or its mating part.

Another method of installing spring pins is the use of a pin driving chuck with a press or air hammer. This method works well in small to medium production environments providing better alignment, control, and quicker cycle times. Securely attach the chuck to the air hammer or press and insert the pin into the open end of the driver leaving an exposed end of the pin. Next, insert the exposed end of the pin to the hole of the mating part and apply force from the air hammer or press until the pin has reached its desired fitment.

For large volume installations, spring pins can be installed by an automatic inserter. These automatic inserters are self-contained units with a hopper that vibrates pins into position for installation into a desired part. This process eliminates the need for manual handling of the pin. The inserter does require an operator to monitor the machine and replenishing it with pins as needed.

Removal:

Proper removal of a spring pin will depend on if the pin is in a blind hole or a through hole. A blind hole is a hole drilled to a specific depth that does not breach the other side of the work piece. A through hole is a hole that goes completely through a work piece.

To remove a spring pin from a through hole, use a properly sized roll pin punch. This will prevent damage to the pin or the mating part. Align the punch to the pin tapping the top of the punch with a hammer driving the pin out the opposite end. Continue this process until the pin as completely cleared the hole.

Removing a spring pin from a blind hole is less common. In some cases, a portion of the pin is exposed, allowing it to be gripped by a pair of pliers for simple removal. If the pin is flush to its mating surface, use of a self-tapping screw may be needed. Start by threading the screw into the center of the pin. For best results, use a screw that is smaller than the diameter of the pin to minimize expansion of the pin against the wall of the hole. Once the screw is threaded into the pin, grip the head of the screw with pliers and pull.

How to measure Spring Pins

Transcript: What we have here is a family of spring pins. We've got your slotted spring pin, your coiled spring pin, your tension bushings. The great thing about all these parts is that they're all measured the same way. Let's measure one. The first thing that you want to measure on a spring pin is you want to measure your diameter. And then you want to measure your overall length. Your overall length on a spring pin is going to be measured from end to end. It's that simple to measure a spring pin. Thanks for watching!

TAPER PINS

Where can I buy taper pins?

G.L. Huyett is your one stop shop for non‑threaded fasteners. As the master distributer of pin and wire form fasteners, G.L. Huyett handles a wide variety of taper pins in nearly any size and finish to fit your application. If you don’t see what you are looking for or require a custom part, contact us today to speak with our experienced, friendly sales team!

What is a taper pin?

Tapered pins are arguably one of the simplest pin designs available, and along with dowel pins, are the oldest. Tapered pins are turned from bar stock to varying tolerances depending on the specification. This production technique is slower than heading and grinding from which dowel pins are manufactured. It is also slower than rolling steel pins (aka rolled pins), thus the popularity and use of tapered pins is declining.

The diameter at the small end of ASME Taper Pins is a function of the length and should be specified as a reference dimension for determining drilled hole size. It shall be computed by multiplying the nominal length of pin by the factor 0.2083 and subtracting the result form the basic pin diameter.

Taper Pin

What are tapered pins used for?

Standard taper pins are used as positioning components for transmitting low torque. These pins can often be found in print presses and other large mechanical assemblies. There are also two other common types of taper pins; externally threaded and internally threaded.

Externally threaded taper pins are threaded at the large end of the pin and are often used in blind holes. They are removed by tightening a hex nut down threaded portion of the pin.

Internally threaded taper pins are designed with tapped hole at the large end of the pin. A bolt can be threaded into this hole to assist with removal of the pin. Internally threaded taper pins are ideal for applications where externally threaded taper pins won’t fit or where a flush fit is needed.

How to measure Standard and Internally Threaded Pins

Transcript: Taper pins are available in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. Whether you're measuring a standard taper pin or an internally threaded taper pin, you're going to measure them the same way. Let's measure one. It's important to note that if you're measuring a taper pin in inches, you want to measure the diameter from the big end. If you're measuring a taper pin that's metric, you want to measure your diameter from the small end. And then we need to measure the nominal length. The nominal length is going to be from edge to edge. And there you have it. It's that simple to measure a taper pin. Thanks for watching!

How to measure Externally Threaded Pins

Transcript: Let’s measure an externally threaded taper pin. The thing to remember about taper pins is if you’re measuring in inches, you want to measure the diameter from the big end. Now if you’re measuring in metric, youl want to measure your diameter from the small end. Then you want to measure the nominal length. The nominal length is going to be from edge to edge and it’s not going to include the stem or the threads. And there it is. It’s that simple to measure an externally threaded taper pin. Thanks for watching!

TETHERS

Where can I buy tethers?

Tethers, or lanyards, can be purchased from G.L. Huyett. As the master distributor of non‑threaded fasteners, G.L. Huyett carries of variety of Steel, Stainless Steel, and Nylon tethers for securing pins, clips, and other retaining hardware. If you don’t see what you are looking for, call us today to speak with our friendly, experienced sales team!

What is a tether?

Tethers, commonly referred to as lanyards, are simple metal or composite cables with loops at each end. They can be attached to any object for added security and are frequently used in the commercial and agricultural industry to provide attachment between a pin and its mating part to minimize lost hardware. One end can be anchored to a fixed part for permanent location when desired.

How to measure a tether / lanyard

There are two primary measurements required for choosing the right lanyard for your application; length and cable size. Measuring points to determine the length of cable you need will depend on the type of cable you are using.

Type 1: Type 1 lanyards have a loop at each end that is created by crimping the cable back onto itself. Length is determined by stretching the lanyard out straight and measuring from one end of the loop to the other.

Type 2: Type 2 lanyards are designed with a loop at one end and an eyelet at the other. Length for Type 2 lanyards is determined by stretching the lanyard out straight and measuring from the outside end of the loop to the center of the eyelet.

Type 3: Type 3 lanyards consist of eyelets at each end of the lanyard. Length for Type 3 lanyards is determined by stretching the lanyard out straight and measuring from center of eyelet to center of eyelet.