Shaft Retention Components at Huyett.com
 

G.L. Huyett is a master distributor offering a wide variety of shaft collars, bearing lock nuts, and bearing lock washers for all of your shaft retention needs. Contact us to speak with our friendly, experienced Sales team to find just the right part for you!

 

Double Split Shaft Collars

Double Split Shaft Collars

Double split shaft collars, or two piece shaft collars, are a two piece clamp on collar that is fastened together using integrated machine screws. The machine screws thread into the ends of each half drawing the two pieces of the collar together to tighten around a shaft. Double split shaft collars can be found in gearbox assemblies, drive shafts, and agricultural implements. The two piece design allows the shaft collar to be installed in‑line without disassembling component parts.

  • Excellent, uniform clamping power
  • Opposing screws provide balance in rotating assemblies
  • Does not mar mating shaft

Single Split Shaft Collars

Single Split Shaft Collars

Single split shaft collars are a one piece clamp on collar with a split on one side featuring a machine screw. They are used as mechanical stops, bearing retainers, or shaft protectors on round shafts, bars, and tubes. Similar to the double split shaft collar, the machine screw is tightened to close the clamp around the shaft.

  • Simple to install and indefinitely adjustable
  • Provide more holding power compared to set screw shaft collars
  • Does not damage the mating shaft

Set Shaft Collars

Set Shaft Collars

Set screw shaft collars are a solid ring featuring a set screw that breaches the inside bore when tightened. The shaft collar fits over a shaft component and the set screw is tightened to hold the clamp in place. This style of collar relies completely on the frictional force applied by the set screw to maintain its position on a shaft. The set screw “bites” into the shaft causing a displacement of the shaft material to provide the holding power of the set shaft collar.

  • Suitable for unhardened shafts
  • Economical, but difficult to adjust or replace
  • Ideal for holding spacers, bearings, and sprockets in place

Bearing Lock Nuts

Bearing Lock Nuts

Bearing locknuts, sometimes called shaft locknuts or bearing retaining nuts, are utilized to secure bearings onto a shaft and are designed to prevent the loosening of components due to vibration and rotation. Bearing locknuts possess a different appearance from traditional hex lock nuts. Bearing locknuts are typically rounded on the outside with keyed slots. This design requires a special tool called a spanner wrench or socket to be removed or installed. Bearing locknuts are used in a wide variety of applications including the automotive and agriculture industries.

  • Available in stainless steel, alloy steel, and low carbon steel
  • Offered in Metric and Inch sizes
  • Commonly used in conjunction with lock washers and machine keys

Bearing Lock Washers

Bearing Lock Washers

Bearing lock washers are a precision fastener used to secure bearing lock nuts in power transmission applications. The inner opening of the washer features a single tab that engages a shaft’s keyway preventing the washer from rotating. The outer circumference of the washer features angled tabs, or tangs, that lock a bearing nut in place by bending over into the machined slots of the nut’s outer diameter.

  • Inner tab works with keyed shafts and adapter sleeves
  • Simple installation with common hand tools
  • Should be replaced when the corresponding lock nut is reinstalled
 


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
By Type

SHAFT COLLARS

What are Shaft Collars used for?

Shaft collars, also called shaft clamps, shaft stops, or shaft collar clamps, are used in a variety of applications to secure or position components on shafts. They are used as stroke limiters, spacers, and positioners. Most often, shaft collars are used in applications with sprocket hubs, bearing holders, and shaft protectors.

What is a Shaft Collar?

A shaft collar, sometimes called a shaft clamp, shaft stop, or shaft collar clamp, is a machined fastener manufactured with a smooth or threaded bore. They often feature a machine screw that applies a frictional force to a mating shaft that holds the collar in place. Shaft collars are manufactured in different varieties, each with their own method of fastening to a shaft.

Single Split Shaft Collar — Single split shaft collars are a one piece clamp on collar with a split on one side featuring a machine screw. Similar to the double split shaft collar, the machine screw is tightened to close the clamp around the shaft. Single split shaft collars provide more holding power than set screw shaft collars, however their clamping force is not as evenly distributed as double split shaft collars (Fig.1).

Double Split Shaft Collar — Double split shaft collars, or two piece shaft collars, are a two piece clamp on collar that is fastened together using integrated machine screws. The machine screws thread into the ends of each half, drawing the two pieces of the collar together to tighten around a shaft. This design allows the shaft collar to be installed in‑line without disassembling saving costs in labor and downtime when adjustment or replacement is needed. Double split shaft collars also provide excellent holding power, evenly distributing pressure to the shaft when its machine screws are torqued (Fig. 1).

Single vs Double Split Collar Forces

Figure 1: Single Split and Double Split Shaft Collars

Threaded Shaft Collar — Threaded shaft collars are manufactured as single split or double split collars. Threaded shaft collars feature a threaded bore that allows the collar to be installed at a precise location on a threaded shaft. The attached machine screw(s) is tightened to close the clamp onto the shaft for tight, secure placement. Threaded shaft collars are suitable for applications that are subject to extreme axial forces.

Set Screw Shaft Collar — Set screw shaft collars are solid ring collars featuring a recessed set screw. The shaft collar fits over a shaft component and the set screw is tightened to hold the clamp in place. This style of collar is the most cost effective, but relies completely on the frictional force applied by the set screw to maintain its position on a shaft. For optimal holding power, the shaft should be made of a softer material than the set screw, thus allowing the set screw to "bite" into the shaft.

Set Screw Collar Impingement

Where can I buy Shaft Collars?

Shaft collars can be purchased online or by phone from G.L. Huyett! We are a master distributor, manufacturer, and importer of non‑threaded and engineered fasteners that includes a wide selection of shaft collars. If you don't see what you are looking for or are in need of a custom part, call us today to speak with our experienced and friendly sales team!

BEARING LOCK NUTS

What is a bearing lock nut?

A bearing locknut, sometimes called a shaft locknut or a shaft nut, is a threaded fastener commonly used for securing bearings, pulleys, and gears on a shaft. Bearing locknuts can be used alongside bearing lock washers to minimize the loosening of assemblies caused by vibration. Bearing locknuts are manufactured with a chamfered outer diameter that features equally spaced machined recesses that allow tightening and loosening by a spanner wrench or socket.

How do bearing lock nuts work?

Bearing lock nuts, sometimes called shaft lock nuts or shaft nuts, are a machined nut that is often used to locate and retain bearings on a shaft. Some bearing lock nuts feature an integrated locking mechanism such as a locking screw. As the locking screw is tightened, it pushes the threads of the lock nut firmly against the threads of the mating shaft using friction to lock the nut in place. Bearing lock nuts that do not have an integrated locking mechanism are often accompanied by bearing lock washers. The tangs on the lock washer are used to secure the bearing lock nut in place.

BEARING LOCK WASHERS

What is a bearing lock washer?

A bearing lock washer is stamped from thin spring metal sheet and designed to contour the chamfer of bearing lock nuts. These washers feature external teeth that can be folded down to fit in the machined notches of a bearing lock nut. Bearing lock washers are also designed with an inner tab that fits in the slot of an adapter sleeve or a shaft's keyway. The external teeth and inner tab of the washer secure the lock nut in place to reduce the potential of unintended loosening.

How to install a bearing lock nut and washer on a keyed shaft:

  1. Slide the bearing lock washer axially onto the desired shaft, ensuring that the inner tab of the washer is seated in the keyway of the shaft. The face of the washer should be flush against the bearing assembly with the external tangs pointing away from the component.
  2. Thread the nut onto the shaft with the chamfer facing the lock washer.
  3. Use a spanner wrench to tighten the nut to the specifications for your application. It is important to select an appropriately sized wrench that securely fits in the slots of the lock nut to avoid slippage, which could damage the nut and corresponding assembly.
  4. Once the lock nut is in position, locate a slot on the circumference of the nut that aligns with an external tang from the lock washer.
  5. Use a drift or standard screw driver to bend the tang until it is firmly seated in the slot of the lock nut. The combination of the inner tab and external tangs lock the bearing nut in place, preventing unwanted loosening.